• Corpus ID: 41279078

Conceptualizing Famine as a Subject of International Criminal Justice: Towards a Modality-Based Approach

@article{DeFalco2016ConceptualizingFA,
  title={Conceptualizing Famine as a Subject of International Criminal Justice: Towards a Modality-Based Approach},
  author={Randle C. DeFalco},
  journal={University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law},
  year={2016},
  volume={38},
  pages={1113}
}
  • Randle C. DeFalco
  • Published 1 May 2016
  • Law
  • University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law
Since the inception of modern international criminal law (ICL), scholars have considered the issue of potential ICL accountability predicated on mass famine situations. Despite this interest, the subject of famine has remained mostly outside the scope of ICL practice to date. This article revisits the question of potential intersections between ICL and modern famines. In doing so, recent real-world famines in Cambodia, North Korea, Somalia and Darfur, along with the current threat of famine… 

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