Conceptual problems in the definition and interpretation of attributable fractions.

@article{Greenland1988ConceptualPI,
  title={Conceptual problems in the definition and interpretation of attributable fractions.},
  author={S. Greenland and J. Robins},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={1988},
  volume={128 6},
  pages={
          1185-97
        }
}
We have argued that the concept of attributable fraction requires separation into the concepts of excess fraction, etiologic fraction, and incidence-density fraction. These quantities do not necessarily approximate one another, and the etiologic fraction is not generally estimable without strong biologic assumptions. For these reasons, care is needed in deciding which (if any) of the concepts is appropriate for a particular application. It appears that the excess fraction (like incidence… Expand

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