Concepts in Insect HostPlant Selection Behavior and Their Application to Host Specificity Testing

@inproceedings{2000ConceptsII,
  title={Concepts in Insect HostPlant Selection Behavior and Their Application to Host Specificity Testing},
  author={},
  year={2000}
}
  • Published 2000
Testing the host specificity of potential agents is an important part of biocontrol methodology. An understanding of the behavioral processes involved in selection of a host plant can be used to improve the accuracy of host specificity testing by biocontrol practitioners and others interested in predicting field host use. These behavioral processes include the sequential nature of host selection behavior, the effects of experience, and time-dependent changes of host acceptance or rejection… CONTINUE READING

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Host Specificity Testing: Why Do We Do It and How We Can Do It Better

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