Comrades, Fill No Glass for Me: Stephen Foster’s Melodies As Borrowed by the American Temperance Movement

@article{Sanders2008ComradesFN,
  title={Comrades, Fill No Glass for Me: Stephen Foster’s Melodies As Borrowed by the American Temperance Movement},
  author={Paul D. Sanders},
  journal={The Social History of Alcohol and Drugs},
  year={2008},
  volume={23},
  pages={24 - 41}
}
  • P. D. Sanders
  • Published 1 September 2008
  • History
  • The Social History of Alcohol and Drugs
Among the thousands of temperance songs written between 1840 and 1920 were many songs set to tunes by American Composer, Stephen Collins Foster (1826–1864). Despite his personal battle with alcohol, he wrote at least two temperance songs, “Comrades, Fill No Glass for Me” and “The Wife,” and temperance writers frequently set their lyrics to some of his more famous tunes. This article explores the borrowing of four of Foster’s best known melodies, “Oh! Susanna,” “Old Folks at Home,” “My Old… 
2 Citations
The Temperance Songs of Stephen C. Foster
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Singing Dry: Music and Temperance in the United States and Canada, 1871–1900
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