Computing TCP's Retransmission Timer

@article{Paxson2000ComputingTR,
  title={Computing TCP's Retransmission Timer},
  author={Vern Paxson and Mark Allman},
  journal={RFC},
  year={2000},
  volume={6298},
  pages={1-11}
}
This document defines the standard algorithm that Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) senders are required to use to compute and manage their retransmission timer. It expands on the discussion in section 4.2.3.1 of RFC 1122 and upgrades the requirement of supporting the algorithm from a SHOULD to a MUST. 

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This memo presents a set of TCP extensions to improve performance over large bandwidth*delay product paths and to provide reliable operation over very high-speed paths. It defines new TCP options for

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This work considers two basic transport estimation problems: determination the setting of the retransmission timer (RTO) for a reliable protocol, and estimating the bandwidth available to a connection as it begins, using a large TCP measurement set for trace-driven simulations.

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EMail: hkchu@google.com Matt Sargent Case Western Reserve University Olin Building

  • EMail: hkchu@google.com Matt Sargent Case Western Reserve University Olin Building
  • 1090

From the data to which we have access, we conclude that the lower initial RTO is likely to be beneficial to many connections, and harmful to relatively few

  • From the data to which we have access, we conclude that the lower initial RTO is likely to be beneficial to many connections, and harmful to relatively few

Author's Addresses: Vern Paxson ACIRI / ICSI 1947 Center Street Suite 600 Berkeley, CA 94704-1198 Phone: 510-642-4274 x302 Fax: 510-643-7684 vern@aciri.org http://www

  • OH 44135 Phone