Computing Adjusted Risk Ratios and Risk Differences in Stata

@article{Norton2013ComputingAR,
  title={Computing Adjusted Risk Ratios and Risk Differences in Stata},
  author={Edward C. Norton and Morgen M. Miller and Lawrence C. Kleinman},
  journal={The Stata Journal},
  year={2013},
  volume={13},
  pages={492 - 509}
}
In this article, we explain how to calculate adjusted risk ratios and risk differences when reporting results from logit, probit, and related nonlinear models. Building on Stata's margins command, we create a new postestimation command, adjrr, that calculates adjusted risk ratios and adjusted risk differences after running a logit or probit model with a binary, a multinomial, or an ordered outcome. adjrr reports the point estimates, delta-method standard errors, and 95% confidence intervals and… 
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