Compressive Ulnar Neuropathies at the Elbow: I. Etiology and Diagnosis

@article{Posner1998CompressiveUN,
  title={Compressive Ulnar Neuropathies at the Elbow: I. Etiology and Diagnosis},
  author={Martin A. Posner},
  journal={Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons},
  year={1998},
  volume={6},
  pages={282–288}
}
  • M. Posner
  • Published 1 September 1998
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
&NA; Ulnar nerve compression at the elbow can occur at any of five sites that begin proximally at the arcade of Struthers and end distally where the nerve exits the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle in the forearm. Compression occurs most commonly at two sites—the epicondylar groove and the point where the nerve passes between the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (i.e., the true cubital tunnel). The differential diagnosis of ulnar neuropathies at the elbow includes lesions that cause… 

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