Compost and compost tea: Principles and prospects as substrates and soil-borne disease management strategies in soil-less vegetable production

@article{StMartin2012CompostAC,
  title={Compost and compost tea: Principles and prospects as substrates and soil-borne disease management strategies in soil-less vegetable production},
  author={Chaney C. G. St. Martin and Richard A. I. Brathwaite},
  journal={Biological Agriculture \& Horticulture},
  year={2012},
  volume={28},
  pages={1 - 33}
}
Numerous studies have demonstrated the potential of composted organic wastes not only as substitutes for peat as a growth substrate but also to stimulate plant growth and suppress soil-borne diseases. The major impediment to the use of compost as substrates or biocontrol agents has been variation in physical and chemical characteristics and disease suppression levels across and within compost types, sources, and batches. Compost tea, a product of compost, has also been shown to suppress soil… Expand
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