Components of tree resilience: effects of successive low‐growth episodes in old ponderosa pine forests

@article{Lloret2011ComponentsOT,
  title={Components of tree resilience: effects of successive low‐growth episodes in old ponderosa pine forests},
  author={Francisco Lloret and Eric G. Keeling and Anna Sala},
  journal={Oikos},
  year={2011},
  volume={120},
  pages={1909-1920}
}
Recent world‐wide episodes of tree dieback have been attributed to increasing temperatures and associated drought. Because these events are likely to become more common, improved knowledge of their cumulative effects on resilience and the ability to recover pre‐disturbance conditions is important for forest management. Here we propose several indices to examine components of individual tree resilience based on tree ring growth: resistance (inverse of growth reduction during the episode… Expand
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