Complexity and evolution: What everybody knows

@article{McShea1991ComplexityAE,
  title={Complexity and evolution: What everybody knows},
  author={Daniel W. McShea},
  journal={Biology and Philosophy},
  year={1991},
  volume={6},
  pages={303-324}
}
  • D. McShea
  • Published 1 July 1991
  • Psychology
  • Biology and Philosophy
The consensus among evolutionists seems to be (and has been for at least a century) that the morphological complexity of organisms increases in evolution, although almost no empirical evidence for such a trend exists. Most studies of complexity have been theoretical, and the few empirical studies have not, with the exception of certain recent ones, been especially rigorous; reviews are presented of both the theoretical and empirical literature. The paucity of evidence raises the question of… 
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