Complexity and context of MHC‐correlated mating preferences in wild populations

@article{Roberts2009ComplexityAC,
  title={Complexity and context of MHC‐correlated mating preferences in wild populations},
  author={Susan C. Roberts},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2009},
  volume={18}
}
There is now substantial and growing evidence for a role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in shaping individual mate preferences. In view of both its codominant expression and its function in immune response, it is often expected that females aim to avoid inbreeding or maximize offspring MHC‐heterozygosity by selecting as mates those males which share fewest or no MHC alleles with themselves. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that this view is over‐simplistic: not only is… 
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