Complex rostral neurovascular system in a giant pliosaur

@article{Foffa2014ComplexRN,
  title={Complex rostral neurovascular system in a giant pliosaur},
  author={Davide Foffa and Judyth Sassoon and Andrew R. Cuff and Mark Mavrogordato and Michael J. Benton},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2014},
  volume={101},
  pages={453-456}
}
Pliosaurs were a long-lived, ubiquitous group of Mesozoic marine predators attaining large body sizes (up to 12 m). Despite much being known about their ecology and behaviour, the mechanisms they adopted for prey detection have been poorly investigated and represent a mystery to date. Complex neurovascular systems in many vertebrate rostra have evolved for prey detection. However, information on the occurrence of such systems in fossil taxa is extremely limited because of poor preservation… 
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