Complex leaf‐gathering skills of mountain gorillas (Gorilla g. beringei): Variability and standardization

@article{Byrne1993ComplexLS,
  title={Complex leaf‐gathering skills of mountain gorillas (Gorilla g. beringei): Variability and standardization},
  author={Richard W. Byrne and Jennifer M. E. Byrne},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={1993},
  volume={31}
}
The skills that mountain gorillas use to deal with the stings, tiny hooks, and spines protecting common plant leaves in their diet were examined for variation within and between animals. Many elements of uni‐ and bimanual performance were identified, often involving delicate precision and coordination, and varying idiosyncratically, erch individual having a different set of preferred elements. Many of these elements are functionally equivalent, and all but one weaned animals showed full… 

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