Corpus ID: 37490690

Complex Projectile Technology and Homo sapiens Dispersal into Western Eurasia

@inproceedings{Shea2010ComplexPT,
  title={Complex Projectile Technology and Homo sapiens Dispersal into Western Eurasia},
  author={John J. Shea and Matthew Sisk},
  year={2010}
}
This paper proposes that complex projectile weaponry was a key strategic innovation driving Late Pleistocene human dispersal into western Eurasia after 50 Ka. It argues that complex projectile weapons of the kind used by ethnographic hunter-gatherers, such as the bow and arrow, and spearthrower and dart, enabled Homo sapiens to overcome obstacles that constrained previous human dispersal from Africa to temperate western Eurasia. In the East Mediterranean Levant, the only permanent land bridge… Expand

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