Complete genome sequence of Tunisvirus, a new member of the proposed family Marseilleviridae

@article{Aherfi2014CompleteGS,
  title={Complete genome sequence of Tunisvirus, a new member of the proposed family Marseilleviridae},
  author={Sarah Aherfi and Mondher Boughalmi and Isabelle Pagnier and Ghislain Fournous and Bernard La Scola and Didier Raoult and Philippe Colson},
  journal={Archives of Virology},
  year={2014},
  volume={159},
  pages={2349-2358}
}
Marseillevirus is the founding member of the proposed family Marseilleviridae, which is the second discovered family of giant viruses that infect amoebae. These viruses have been recovered from environmental water samples and, more recently, from humans. Tunisvirus was isolated from fountain water in Tunis, Tunisia, by culturing on Acanthamoeba spp. and is a new marseillevirus. We describe here its 380,011 base-pair genome. A total of 484 proteins were identified, among which 320 and 358 have… Expand
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