Complement coercion is not modulated by competition: evidence from eye movements.

@article{Frisson2008ComplementCI,
  title={Complement coercion is not modulated by competition: evidence from eye movements.},
  author={Steven Frisson and Brian McElree},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={2008},
  volume={34 1},
  pages={
          1-11
        }
}
  • S. Frisson, B. McElree
  • Published 2008
  • Psychology
  • Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
An eye-movement study examined the processing of expressions requiring complement coercion (J. Pustejovsky, 1995), in which a noun phrase that does not denote an event (e.g., the book) appears as the complement of an event-selecting verb (e.g., began the book). Previous studies demonstrated that these expressions are more costly to process than are control expressions that can be processed with basic compositional operations (L. Pylkkanen & B. McElree, 2006). Complement coercion is thought to… 

Tables from this paper

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Although Complement Coercion has been systematically associated with computational cost, there remains a serious confound in the experimental evidence built up in previous studies. The confound
Electrophysiological Correlates of Complement Coercion
TLDR
This study examined the electrophysiological correlates of complement coercion and suggested that the N400 modulation to both coerced and animacy-violated complement nouns reflected different types of mismatches between the semantic restrictions of the verb and the semantic properties of the incoming complement noun.
Complement coercion in Polish and the role of selectional restrictions revealed in a self-paced reading study1
So-called ‘complement coercion’ (‘begin a book’), understood as a combinatorial conflict, is mainly analysed as a repair operation in composition. Experimental data has shown that there is an extra
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