Competitive Exclusion in Herbaceous Vegetation

@article{Grime1973CompetitiveEI,
  title={Competitive Exclusion in Herbaceous Vegetation},
  author={John Philip Grime},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1973},
  volume={242},
  pages={344-347}
}
  • J. P. Grime
  • Published 30 March 1973
  • Environmental Science
  • Nature
IN maintaining or reconstructing types of herbaceous vegetation in which the density of flowering plants exceeds 20 species/m2—the so-called “species-rich” communities, success is often frustrated by competitive exclusion. Here I describe an attempt to identify criteria with which to assess or anticipate the effect of competitive exclusion both at individual sites and in different types of vegetation. 
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