Competition with a host nestling for parental provisioning imposes recoverable costs on parasitic cuckoo chick's growth

@article{Geltsch2012CompetitionWA,
  title={Competition with a host nestling for parental provisioning imposes recoverable costs on parasitic cuckoo chick's growth},
  author={Nikoletta Geltsch and Mark. E. Hauber and Michael G. Anderson and Mikl{\'o}s B{\'a}n and Csaba Mosk{\'a}t},
  journal={Behavioural Processes},
  year={2012},
  volume={90},
  pages={378-383}
}

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