Competition and the Structure of Granivore Communities

@article{Davidson1980CompetitionAT,
  title={Competition and the Structure of Granivore Communities},
  author={Diane W. Davidson and James H Brown and Richard S. Inouye},
  journal={BioScience},
  year={1980},
  volume={30},
  pages={233-238}
}
characteristics that reduce overlap in the use of resources. Ecologists have interpreted the differences in the body sizes, feeding structures, microhabitat specializations, and foraging behaviors of related and coexisting species as evidence for the importance of competition in structuring natural communities. The theoretical underpinnings of this comparative approach to the study of competition predict "limiting similarities" in characteristics relevant to allocation of searce resources (May… Expand

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