Compensatory head roll in the blowfly Calliphora during flight

@article{Hengstenberg1986CompensatoryHR,
  title={Compensatory head roll in the blowfly Calliphora during flight},
  author={Roland Hengstenberg and D. C. Sandeman and B Hengstenberg},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences},
  year={1986},
  volume={227},
  pages={455 - 482}
}
Video records were made of the blowfly Calliphora erythrocephala L. mainly during tethered flight in a wind-tunnel, to study its movements about the longitudinal body axis (roll). During undisturbed flight, flies hold their head on average aligned with the body but may turn it about all three body axes. Pitch and yaw turns of the head are comparatively small (20°), whereas roll turns can be large (90°), and fast (1200° s-1). When passively rolled, flies produce compensatory head movements… 

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