Comparison processes in category learning: From theory to behavior

@article{Hammer2008ComparisonPI,
  title={Comparison processes in category learning: From theory to behavior},
  author={Rubi Hammer and Aharon Bar-Hillel and Tomer Hertz and Daphna Weinshall and Shaul Hochstein},
  journal={Brain Research},
  year={2008},
  volume={1225},
  pages={102-118}
}
Recent studies stressed the importance of comparing exemplars both for improving performance by artificial classifiers as well as for explaining human category-learning strategies. In this report we provide a theoretical analysis for the usability of exemplar comparison for category-learning. We distinguish between two types of comparison -- comparison of exemplars identified to belong to the same category vs. comparison of exemplars identified to belong to two different categories. Our… Expand

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