Comparison of wing morphology in three birds of prey: Correlations with differences in flight behavior

@article{Corvidae2006ComparisonOW,
  title={Comparison of wing morphology in three birds of prey: Correlations with differences in flight behavior},
  author={Elaine L. Corvidae and Richard O Bierregaard and Susan E. Peters},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2006},
  volume={267}
}
Flight is the overriding characteristic of birds that has influenced most of their morphological, physiological, and behavioral features. [...] Key Method Oxidative and glycolytic enzyme activities of several muscles were also analyzed via assays for citrate synthase (CS) and for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). It was found that structural characteristics of these three raptors differ in ways consistent with prevailing aerodynamic models. The similarity of enzymatic activities among different muscles of the three…Expand
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