Comparison of the Chemical Compositions of the Cuticle and Dufour’s Gland of Two Solitary Bee Species from Laboratory and Field Conditions

@article{PittsSinger2017ComparisonOT,
  title={Comparison of the Chemical Compositions of the Cuticle and Dufour’s Gland of Two Solitary Bee Species from Laboratory and Field Conditions},
  author={Theresa L. Pitts‐Singer and Marcia M. Hagen and Bryan R. Helm and Steven A. Highland and James S. Buckner and William P. Kemp},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2017},
  volume={43},
  pages={451 - 468}
}
Species-specific biochemistry, morphology, and function of the Dufour’s gland have been investigated for social bees and some non-social bee families. Most of the solitary bees previously examined are ground-nesting bees that use Dufour’s gland secretions to line brood chambers. This study examines the chemistry of the cuticle and Dufour’s gland of cavity-nesting Megachile rotundata and Osmia lignaria, which are species managed for crop pollination. Glandular and cuticular lipid compositions… 

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Dufour's gland analysis reveals caste and physiology specific signals in Bombus impatiens.

It is demonstrated that compounds in the Dufour's gland act as caste- and physiology-specific signals and are used by workers to discriminate between workers of different social and reproductive status.

physiology specific signals in Bombus 2 impatien s 3 4 5

  • 2020

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This study documents the evolution and possible function(s) of the Dufour's gland secretions in bees of the families Colletidae, Halictidae and Oxaeidae.

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