Comparison of pollination and defensive buzzes in bumblebees indicates species-specific and context-dependent vibrations

@article{Luca2014ComparisonOP,
  title={Comparison of pollination and defensive buzzes in bumblebees indicates species-specific and context-dependent vibrations},
  author={Paul A. De Luca and Darryl A. Cox and Mario Vallejo‐Mar{\'i}n},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2014},
  volume={101},
  pages={331-338}
}
Bees produce vibrations in many contexts, including for defense and while foraging. Buzz pollination is a unique foraging behavior in which bees vibrate the anthers of flowers to eject pollen which is then collected and used as food. The relationships between buzzing properties and pollen release are well understood, but it is less clear to what extent buzzing vibrations vary among species, even though such information is crucial to understanding the functional relationships between bees and… Expand
Floral Sonication is an Innate Behaviour in Bumblebees that can be Fine-Tuned with Experience in Manipulating Flowers
TLDR
Investigation of the ability of the buff-tailed bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) to modify the frequency and amplitude of their buzzes with increasing experience manipulating flowers of the buzz-pollinated plant Solanum rostratum suggests that bumblebees are able to modified the characteristics of their Buzzes with experience manipulating buzz- pollinated flowers. Expand
Floral vibrations by buzz-pollinating bees achieve higher frequency, velocity and acceleration than flight and defence vibrations
TLDR
Despite being produced by the same set of muscles, the vibrations bumblebees produce during buzz-pollination, defensive buzzing and flight all significantly differ in their biomechanical properties. Expand
Floral vibrations by buzz-pollinating bees achieve higher frequency, velocity and acceleration than flight and defence vibrations
TLDR
By increasing frequency and amplitude velocity and acceleration of their vibrations during vibratory pollen collection, foraging bees may be able to maximise pollen removal from flowers, although their foraging decisions are likely to be influenced by the presumably high cost of producing floral vibrations. Expand
Does body size predict the buzz‐pollination frequencies used by bees?
TLDR
Investigation of the influence of body size in a specialized pollination system where bees vibrate flowers to release pollen concealed within poricidal stamens found floral vibration frequencies were significantly higher than flight frequencies, but never exceeded 400 Hz. Expand
Bee pollination biology: buzzing, behavior, and biomechanics
TLDR
This work describes some of the relationships between plants and pollinators and focuses on buzz pollination (or floral sonication), which is particularly useful when bees collect pollen from plants that have poricidal anthers that release pollen only from small pores. Expand
Bee and floral traits affect the characteristics of the vibrations experienced by flowers during buzz pollination
ABSTRACT During buzz pollination, bees use their indirect flight muscles to produce vibrations that are transmitted to the flowers and result in pollen release. Although buzz pollination has beenExpand
Buzz pollination: studying bee vibrations on flowers.
TLDR
How bee morphology and behaviour affect the mechanical properties of vibrations, and how floral traits may influence the transmission of those vibrations from the bee to the anther, thus mediating pollen release, and ultimately bee and plant fitness are discussed. Expand
Flight of the bumble bee: Buzzes predict pollination services
TLDR
The results indicate that acoustic signatures of flight can be deciphered to monitor bee activity and pollination services to bumble bee pollinated plants and it is proposed that applications of this technique could assist scientists and farmers in rapidly detecting and responding to bee population declines. Expand
Bumblebee sonication behavior changes with plant species and environmental conditions
TLDR
It is found that individual bumblebees change their sonication frequency and duration when collecting pollen from flowers of three different Solanum plants, suggesting that bees may change theirSonication behavior to optimize pollen release from different types of flowers. Expand
Ricochet pollination in Senna (Fabaceae) - petals deflect pollen jets and promote division of labour among flower structures.
TLDR
The pollen ricochet mechanism promotes a division of labour by involving additional floral organs, such as petals, reinforcing the Müllers' division-of-labour hypothesis; alternative, non-multiexclusive hypotheses could be explored in genus Senna and other angiosperm species. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 56 REFERENCES
Variability in bumblebee pollination buzzes affects the quantity of pollen released from flowers
TLDR
It is suggested that foraging bumblebees may improve pollen collection by increasing the duration or amplitude of their buzzes, given that amplitude is positively correlated with mass, and preferential foraging by heavier workers is likely to result in the largest pollen yields per bee. Expand
Behavioral responses by bumble bees to variation in pollen availability
TLDR
Simulation results indicate that the observed movement patterns of bumble bees on Lupinus inflorescences would return the most pollen per unit of expended energy, and the increased foraging efficiency resulting from facultative responses by bees to variation in pollen availability, especially changes in the frequency and intensity of grooming, could correspondingly decrease pollen dispersal between plants. Expand
The pollination ecology of buzz-pollinated Rhexia virginica (Melastomataceae).
TLDR
Experimental manipulations provided little support for the hypothesis that the yellow color of melastome anthers mimics abundant pollen, thereby deceiving pollinators to visit regardless of whether most pollen has been removed, but studies of bumble bee foraging behavior and correlates of seed set provided indirect support for this hypothesis. Expand
Buzz foraging mechanism of bumble bees
TLDR
B. hortorum workers were more effective than B. terrestris workers at vibrating the anthers of Symphytum officinale (comfrey) because they inserted their heads into the corolla for nectar. Expand
What's the 'buzz' about? The ecology and evolutionary significance of buzz-pollination.
TLDR
It is suggested that buzz-pollination evolves as the result of an escalation in the competition between plants and pollen-consuming floral visitors (including pollen thieves and true pollinators) to control the rate of pollen removal from flowers. Expand
Effectiveness of buzz pollination in Pedicularis chamissonis: significance of multiple visits by bumblebees
TLDR
Buzz pollination in P. chamissonis acts as a mechanism that improves the chance of cross-pollination upon multiple visits if pollinator visitation is frequent, and evidence of interference between self and outcross pollen was lacking for seed production. Expand
Can alloethism in workers of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, be explained in terms of foraging efficiency?
TLDR
This work established whether workers of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris (L.) (Hymenoptera; Apidae), exhibit alloethism, and quantified the size of workers engaging in foraging compared to those that remain in the nest, and confirmed that it is the larger bees that tend to forage. Expand
A biophysical model for buzz pollination in angiosperms.
TLDR
A biophysical model for the pollen/locule wall interactions resulting in pollen expulsion upon bee or artificial vibration is developed and is generally applicable to any apically dehiscent flower which is vibrated by bees to release pollen. Expand
The functional significance of poricidal anthers and buzz pollination: controlled pollen removal from Dodecatheon
TLDR
This work investigated whether the poricidal anthers of Dodecatheon conjugens function as dispensing mechanisms by comparing pollen removal in response to buzz frequencies that pollen-collecting bumble-bees produce with removal stimulated by higher frequencies. Expand
BUZZ‐POLLINATION AND PATTERNS IN SEXUAL TRAITS IN NORTH EUROPEAN PYROLACEAE
Flower biology and pollination of Moneses uniflora, Orthilia secunda, Pyrola minor, P. rotundifolia, P. chlorantha, and Chimaphila umbellata are described and discussed in relation to patterns inExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...