Comparison of methods of extracting information for meta-analysis of observational studies in nutritional epidemiology

@article{Bae2016ComparisonOM,
  title={Comparison of methods of extracting information for meta-analysis of observational studies in nutritional epidemiology},
  author={Jong-Myon Bae},
  journal={Epidemiology and Health},
  year={2016},
  volume={38}
}
  • J. Bae
  • Published 11 January 2016
  • Medicine
  • Epidemiology and Health
OBJECTIVES: A common method for conducting a quantitative systematic review (QSR) for observational studies related to nutritional epidemiology is the “highest versus lowest intake” method (HLM), in which only the information concerning the effect size (ES) of the highest category of a food item is collected on the basis of its lowest category. However, in the interval collapsing method (ICM), a method suggested to enable a maximum utilization of all available information, the ES information is… 

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