Comparison of human infants and rhesus monkeys on Piaget's AB task: evidence for dependence on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex

@article{Diamond2004ComparisonOH,
  title={Comparison of human infants and rhesus monkeys on Piaget's AB task: evidence for dependence on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex},
  author={Adele Diamond and Patricia S. Goldman-Rakic},
  journal={Experimental Brain Research},
  year={2004},
  volume={74},
  pages={24-40}
}
SummaryThis paper reports evidence linking dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with one of the cognitive abilities that emerge between 7.5–12 months in the human infant. The task used was Piaget's Stage IV Object Permanence Test, known as AB (pronounced “A not B”). The AB task was administered (a) to human infants who were followed longitudinally and (b) to intact and operated adult rhesus monkeys with bilateral prefrontal and parietal lesions. Human infants displayed a clear developmental… 

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