Comparison of clinical trial recruitment populations: treatment-seeking characteristics of opioid-, cocaine-, and cannabis-using participants.

Abstract

This study examined the treatment history and intention to seek treatment among 489 individuals interested in substance use disorder clinical trial participation. Opioid and cocaine users were more likely than cannabis users to report having received treatment for substance use in the past and more likely than cannabis users to report planning to seek treatment for substance use before exposure to recruitment advertising. Free cost was the aspect of clinical trial participation that most influenced the decision to make an intake evaluation appointment for opioid-dependent patients as compared with cocaine- and cannabis-dependent participants, and the availability of individual psychotherapy most influenced those who were cannabis dependent. Cannabis-dependent individuals evaluated for clinical trial participation reported that recruitment advertising was an important factor in leading them to seek treatment. These results have implications for clinical trial recruitment and public health efforts directed at encouraging cannabis-dependent individuals to seek treatment.

DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2011.01.005

Cite this paper

@article{Mariani2011ComparisonOC, title={Comparison of clinical trial recruitment populations: treatment-seeking characteristics of opioid-, cocaine-, and cannabis-using participants.}, author={John J Mariani and Wendy Y. Cheng and Adam M. Bisaga and Maria Ann Sullivan and Kenneth C Carpenter and Edward V. Nunes and Frances Rudnick Levin}, journal={Journal of substance abuse treatment}, year={2011}, volume={40 4}, pages={426-30} }