Comparing the effects of nasal synchronized intermittent positive pressure ventilation (nSIPPV) and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) after extubation in very low birth weight infants.

@article{Moretti1999ComparingTE,
  title={Comparing the effects of nasal synchronized intermittent positive pressure ventilation (nSIPPV) and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) after extubation in very low birth weight infants.},
  author={Corrado Moretti and Camilla Gizzi and Paola Papoff and S Lampariello and Mauro Capoferri and Giovanni Calcagnini and Giovanni Bucci},
  journal={Early human development},
  year={1999},
  volume={56 2-3},
  pages={167-77}
}
In this study we hypothesized that nasal synchronized intermittent positive pressure ventilation (nSIPPV) would provide more ventilatory support than nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in the immediate post-extubation period in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the effects of these two ventilatory techniques on ventilation, gas exchange, and patient inspiratory effort in 11 preterm infants immediately after extubation. All neonates… CONTINUE READING

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Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation with or without very early surfactant therapy for the primary treatment of respiratory distress syndrome.

The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians • 2016

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