Comparing the English Video Lineup with the 48-Person Lineup

@article{Levi2017ComparingTE,
  title={Comparing the English Video Lineup with the 48-Person Lineup},
  author={Avraham M. Levi},
  journal={Universal Journal of Psychology},
  year={2017},
  volume={5},
  pages={239-243}
}
  • A. Levi
  • Published 1 December 2017
  • Psychology
  • Universal Journal of Psychology
Levi has been experimenting with large lineups, in particular a 48-person lineup. After showing experimental participants a 2 minute video more than an hour before, participants were shown 4 screens of 12 lineup members. They could view the screens as often as they liked before reaching a decision. This study compared the 48-person lineup with the British lineup. Contrary to prediction, the British lineup did not outperform the 48-person one in identifications of the target. As there was also… Expand

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