Comparing radio-tracking and visual detection methods to quantify group size measures

@article{Reiczigel2015ComparingRA,
  title={Comparing radio-tracking and visual detection methods to quantify group size measures},
  author={Jeno Reiczigel and Mar{\'i}a Fernanda Mej{\'i}a Salazar and Trent K. Bollinger and Lajos R{\'o}zsa},
  journal={European Journal of Ecology},
  year={2015},
  volume={1},
  pages={1 - 4}
}
Abstract 1. Average values of animal group sizes are prone to be overestimated in traditional field studies because small groups and singletons are easier to overlook than large ones. This kind of bias also applies for the method of locating groups by tracking previously radio-collared individuals in the wild. If the researcher randomly chooses a collared animal to locate a group to visit, a large group has higher probability to be selected than a small one, simply because it has more members… 

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