Corpus ID: 14306381

Comparing evolvability and variability of quantitative traits.

@article{Houle1992ComparingEA,
  title={Comparing evolvability and variability of quantitative traits.},
  author={David Houle},
  journal={Genetics},
  year={1992},
  volume={130 1},
  pages={
          195-204
        }
}
  • D. Houle
  • Published 1992
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Genetics
There are two distinct reasons for making comparisons of genetic variation for quantitative characters. The first is to compare evolvabilities, or ability to respond to selection, and the second is to make inferences about the forces that maintain genetic variability. Measures of variation that are standardized by the trait mean, such as the additive genetic coefficient of variation, are appropriate for both purposes. Variation has usually been compared as narrow sense heritabilities, but this… Expand
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