Comparative unpalatability of mimetic viceroy butterflies (Limenitis archippus) from four south-eastern United States populations

@article{Ritland2004ComparativeUO,
  title={Comparative unpalatability of mimetic viceroy butterflies (Limenitis archippus) from four south-eastern United States populations},
  author={David B. Ritland},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={103},
  pages={327-336}
}
Viceroy butterflies (Limenitis archippus), long considered palatable mimics of distasteful danaine butterflies, have been shown in studies involving laboratoryreared specimens to be moderately unpalatable to avian predators. This implies that some viceroys are Müllerian co-mimics, rather than defenseless Batesian mimics, of danaines. Here, I further test this hypothesis by assessing the palatability of wild-caught viceroys from four genetically and ecologically diverse populations in the… 
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