Comparative rates of violence in chimpanzees and humans

@article{Wrangham2005ComparativeRO,
  title={Comparative rates of violence in chimpanzees and humans},
  author={Richard W. Wrangham and Michael Lawrence Wilson and Martin N. Muller},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2005},
  volume={47},
  pages={14-26}
}
This paper tests the proposal that chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and humans have similar rates of death from intraspecific aggression, whereas chimpanzees have higher rates of non-lethal physical attack (Boehm 1999, Hierarchy in the forest: the evolution of egalitarian behavior. Harvard University Press). First, we assembled data on lethal aggression from long-term studies of nine communities of chimpanzees living in five populations. We calculated rates of death from intraspecific aggression… 

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