Comparative phylogenetic analysis of cystatin gene families from arabidopsis, rice and barley

@article{Martnez2005ComparativePA,
  title={Comparative phylogenetic analysis of cystatin gene families from arabidopsis, rice and barley},
  author={Manuel Mart{\'i}nez and Zamira Abraham and Pilar Carbonero and Isabel D{\'i}az},
  journal={Molecular Genetics and Genomics},
  year={2005},
  volume={273},
  pages={423-432}
}
The plant cystatins or phytocystatins comprise a family of specific inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. Such inhibitors are thought to be involved in the regulation of several endogenous processes and in defence against pests and pathogens. Extensive searches in the complete rice and Arabidopsis genomes and in barley EST collections have allowed us to predict the presence of twelve different cystatin genes in rice, seven in Arabidopsis, and at least seven in barley. Structural comparisons based… 
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Characterization of the Entire Cystatin Gene Family in Barley and Their Target Cathepsin L-Like Cysteine-Proteases, Partners in the Hordein Mobilization during Seed Germination1[W]
TLDR
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The diversity of rice phytocystatins
TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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