Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation

@article{Zhang2014ComparativeGR,
  title={Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation},
  author={Guojie Zhang and Cai Li and Qiye Li and Bo Li and Denis M. Larkin and Chul Lee and Jay F. Storz and Agostinho Antunes and Matthew J. Greenwold and R Meredith and Anders Ödeen and Jie Cui and Qi Zhou and Luohao Xu and Hailin Pan and Zongji Wang and Lijun Jin and Pei Zhang and Haofu Hu and Wei Yang and Jiang Hu and Jin Xiao and Zhikai Yang and Yang Liu and Qiaolin Xie and Hao Yu and Jinmin Lian and Ping Wen and Fang Zhang and Hui Li and Yongli Zeng and Zijun Xiong and Shiping Liu and Long Zhou and Zhiyong Huang and Na An and Jie Wang and Qiumei Zheng and Yingqi Xiong and Guangbiao Wang and Bo-wen Wang and Jingjing Wang and Yu Fan and Rute R. da Fonseca and Alonzo Alfaro-N{\'u}{\~n}ez and Mikkel Schubert and Ludovic Orlando and Tobias Mourier and Jason T. Howard and Ganeshkumar Ganapathy and Andreas R. Pfenning and Osceola Whitney and Miriam V. Rivas and Erina Hara and Julia Gage Smith and Marta Farr{\'e} and Jitendra Narayan and Gancho T Slavov and Michael N Romanov and Rui Borges and Jo{\~a}o Paulo Machado and Imran Khan and Mark S. Springer and John Gatesy and Federico G. Hoffmann and Juan C. Opazo and Olle H{\aa}stad and Roger H. Sawyer and Heebal Kim and Kyu-Won Kim and Hyeon Jeong Kim and Seoae Cho and Ning Li and Yinhua Huang and Michael William Bruford and Xiangjiang Zhan and Andrew Dixon and Mads Frost Bertelsen and Elizabeth Perrault Derryberry and Wesley C. Warren and Richard K. Wilson and Shengbin Li and David A. Ray and Richard E. Green and Stephen J. O’Brien and Darren K. Griffin and Warren E. Johnson and David Haussler and Oliver A. Ryder and Eske Willerslev and Gary R Graves and Per Alstr{\"o}m and Jon Fjelds{\aa} and David P. Mindell and Scott V. Edwards and Edward L. Braun and Carsten Rahbek and David W. Burt and Peter Houde and Yong Zhang and Huanming Yang and Jian Wang and Emanuel Maldonado and Erich D. Jarvis and M. Thomas P. Gilbert and Jun Wang},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={346},
  pages={1311 - 1320}
}
Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary… 

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