Comparative demography of treecreepers: evaluating hypotheses for the evolution and maintenance of cooperative breeding

@article{Doerr2006ComparativeDO,
  title={Comparative demography of treecreepers: evaluating hypotheses for the evolution and maintenance of cooperative breeding},
  author={E. Doerr and V. Doerr},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2006},
  volume={72},
  pages={147-159}
}
Despite the long history of research on cooperative breeding, few comparative studies have been undertaken to test hypotheses for the evolution and maintenance of delayed dispersal using data from both cooperative and noncooperative species. We tested predictions about demographic differences between cooperative and noncooperative species based on four hypotheses for the evolution of delayed dispersal: the ecological constraints hypothesis, the life history hypothesis, the broad constraints… Expand
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