Comparative and demographic analysis of orangutan genomes

@article{Locke2011ComparativeAD,
  title={Comparative and demographic analysis of orangutan genomes},
  author={Devin P. Locke and LaDeana W. Hillier and Wesley C. Warren and Kim C. Worley and Lynne V. Nazareth and Donna M. Muzny and Shiaw-Pyng Yang and Zhengyuan O. Wang and Asif T. Chinwalla and Patrick Minx and Makedonka Dautova Mitreva and Lisa L. Cook and Kimberley D. Delehaunty and Catrina C. Fronick and Heather K. Schmidt and Lucinda A. Fulton and Robert S. Fulton and Joanne O. Nelson and Vincent J. Magrini and Craig S. Pohl and Tina Graves and Chris Markovic and Andrew Cree and Huyen Dinh and Jennifer Hume and Christie L. Kovar and Gerald R. Fowler and Gerton Lunter and Stephen Meader and Andreas Heger and Chris Paul Ponting and Tom{\'a}s Marqu{\`e}s-Bonet and Can Alkan and Lin Chen and Ze Cheng and Jeffrey M. Kidd and Evan E. Eichler and Simon White and Stephen M. J. Searle and Albert J. Vilella and Yuan Chen and Paul Flicek and Jian Ma and Brian J. Raney and Bernard B. Suh and Richard Burhans and Javier Herrero and David Haussler and Rui Faria and Olga Fernando and Fleur Darr{\'e} and Dom{\`e}nec Farr{\'e} and Elodie Gazave and Meritxell Oliva and Arcadi Navarro and Roberta Roberto and Oronzo Capozzi and Nicoletta Archidiacono and Giuliano Della Valle and Stefania Purgato and Mariano Rocchi and Miriam K. Konkel and Jerilyn A. Walker and Brygg Ullmer and Mark A. Batzer and Arian F. A. Smit and Robert M. Hubley and Claudio Casola and Daniel R. Schrider and Matthew W. Hahn and V{\'i}ctor Quesada and Xos{\'e} S. Puente and Gonzalo R. Ord{\'o}{\~n}ez and Carlos L{\'o}pez-Ot{\'i}n and Tom{\'a}{\vs} Vinař and Broňa Brejov{\'a} and Aakrosh Ratan and Robert S. Harris and Webb Miller and Carolin Kosiol and Heather A. Lawson and Vikas Taliwal and Andr{\'e} L. Martins and Adam C. Siepel and Arindam Roychoudhury and Xin Ma and Jeremiah D. Degenhardt and Carlos D. Bustamante and Ryan N. Gutenkunst and Thomas Mailund and Julien Yann Dutheil and Asger Hobolth and Mikkel Heide Schierup and Leona G. Chemnick and Oliver A. Ryder and Yuko Yoshinaga and Pieter J de Jong and George M. Weinstock and Jeffrey Rogers and Elaine R. Mardis and Richard A. Gibbs and Richard K. Wilson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={469},
  pages={529 - 533}
}
‘Orang-utan’ is derived from a Malay term meaning ‘man of the forest’ and aptly describes the southeast Asian great apes native to Sumatra and Borneo. The orang-utan species, Pongo abelii (Sumatran) and Pongo pygmaeus (Bornean), are the most phylogenetically distant great apes from humans, thereby providing an informative perspective on hominid evolution. Here we present a Sumatran orang-utan draft genome assembly and short read sequence data from five Sumatran and five Bornean orang-utan… 

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