Comparative Review of Death Sentences: An Empirical Study of the Georgia Experience

@article{Baldus1983ComparativeRO,
  title={Comparative Review of Death Sentences: An Empirical Study of the Georgia Experience},
  author={David C. Baldus and Charles A. Pulaski and George G. Woodworth},
  journal={Journal of Criminal Law \& Criminology},
  year={1983},
  volume={74},
  pages={661}
}

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