Community structure of caprellids (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Caprellidae) on seagrasses from southern Spain

@article{Gonzlez2008CommunitySO,
  title={Community structure of caprellids (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Caprellidae) on seagrasses from southern Spain},
  author={A. R. Gonz{\'a}lez and Jos{\'e} Manuel Guerra-Garc{\'i}a and Manuel J Maestre and Aurora Ruiz-Tabares and Free Espinosa and Ismael Gordillo and Juan Emilio S{\'a}nchez-Moyano and Jos{\'e} C. Garc{\'i}a-G{\'o}mez},
  journal={Helgoland Marine Research},
  year={2008},
  volume={62},
  pages={189-199}
}
The community structure of caprellids inhabiting two species of seagrass (Cymodocea nodosa and Zostera marina) was investigated on the Andalusian coast, southern Spain, using uni and multivariate analyses. Three meadows were selected (Almería, AL; Málaga, MA; Cádiz, CA), and changes in seagrass cover and biomass were measured from 2004 to 2005. Four caprellid species were found; the density of Caprella acanthifera, Phtisica marina and Pseudoprotella phasma was correlated to seagrass biomass. No… 
Caprellid assemblages (Crustacea: Amphipoda) in shallow waters invaded by Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea from southeastern Spain
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It is concluded that introduced C. racemosa may serve as a new habitat, promoting and maintaining caprellid populations in shallow Mediterranean habitats.
Peracarid assemblages of Zostera meadows in an estuarine ecosystem (O Grove inlet, NW Iberian Peninsula): spatial distribution and seasonal variation
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The presence of the seagrasses should influence in a major way the hydrodynamic and sedimentary features of the habitat and utterly the spatial and temporal patterns observed in the peracarid assemblage in the O Grove inlet.
An illustrated key to the soft-bottom caprellids (Crustacea: Amphipoda) of the Iberian Peninsula and remarks to their ecological distribution along the Andalusian coast
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The soft-bottom caprellids of the Iberian Peninsula are revised and the dominant species was Pseudolirius kroyeri, which was significantly more abundant in fine sediments than in gross sediments, and further efforts are needed to explore biodiversity of deeper areas.
Composition and structure of the molluscan assemblage associated with a Cymodocea nodosa bed in south-eastern Spain: seasonal and diel variation
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The molluscan taxocoenosis associated with a Cymodocea nodosa seagrass bed was studied throughout 1 year in Genoveses Bay, in the MPA “Parque Natural Cabo de Gata-Níjar” (south-eastern Spain), showing a significant seasonal and diel variation.
Reproductive features of sympatric species of Caprella (Amphipoda) on the southeastern Brazilian coast: a comparative study
TLDR
It was found that the total length of females (TL) was inversely proportional to F, where C. danilevskii , the larger species, showed a lower number of eggs, but with larger sizes, while C. scaura , despite having a total length greater than that of C. equilibra , showed a similar volume of eggs.
Seasonal fluctuations of some biological traits of the invader Caprella scaura (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Caprellidae) in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, southern Italy)
TLDR
The results of this study showed that the population dynamics of this caprellid was not dissimilar to that of other caprellids or marine epifaunal Crustacea and its density suggests that it is not yet a strong invader.
A new species of Caprella (Crustacea: Amphipoda) from the Mediterranean Sea
TLDR
A new caprellid amphipod is described based on specimens collected from a Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadow at the Tavolara-Punta Coda Cavallo Marine Protected Area (Sardinia, Mediterranean Sea).
Population dynamics of Caprella dilatata and Caprella equilibra (Peracarida: Amphipoda) in a Southwestern Atlantic harbour
TLDR
The present study suggests that the population dynamics of C. equilibra are intimately related to seawater temperature, while for C. dilatata no relationship was found and future studies of ecology and behaviour traits in caprellid species are needed.
Spreading and Establishment of the Non Indigenous Species Caprella scaura (Amphipoda: Caprellidae) in the Central Region of the Aegean Sea (Eastern Mediterranean Sea)
Caprella scaura is an invasive amphipod, native to the Indian Ocean, which has already spread to several regions of the world, including the Mediterranean Sea. The present study reports the first
Extended distribution of Phtisica marina Slabber, 1769 (Crustacea: Amphipoda): first observation of alien Caprellid in the coastal waters of Indian subcontinent
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This study chronicles the further spreading out of P. marina into the Indian coastal waters and discusses the most possible introductory vectors and pathways.
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Ecology of 2 littoral species of caprellid amphipod amphipods is compared and Caprella laeviuscula, a periphyton scraper/filter-feeder, are most dense on eelgrass Zostera marina, while the structure of the O. dichotoma epibiotic community depends more on the seasonality of O. categotoma occurrence than on organismal interactions.
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