Community Development and Persistence in a Low Rocky Intertidal Zone

@article{Lubchenco1978CommunityDA,
  title={Community Development and Persistence in a Low Rocky Intertidal Zone},
  author={J. Lubchenco and B. Menge},
  journal={Ecological Monographs},
  year={1978},
  volume={48},
  pages={67-94}
}
This paper analyzes the factors controlling the development and persistence of patterns of distribution, abundance, and diversity of space users in the low rocky intertidal zone of New England. The spatial structure of this community changes along a wave exposure gradient. Mussels (Mytilus edulis) dominate at headlands exposed to wave shock, the alga Chondrus crispus (Irish moss) dominates at sites protected from wave shock, and both are abundant at areas intermediate in exposure to waves… Expand
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