Community Assembly Through Adaptive Radiation in Hawaiian Spiders

@article{Gillespie2004CommunityAT,
  title={Community Assembly Through Adaptive Radiation in Hawaiian Spiders},
  author={Rosemary G. Gillespie},
  journal={Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={303},
  pages={356 - 359}
}
  • R. Gillespie
  • Published 16 January 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
Communities arising through adaptive radiation are generally regarded as unique, with speciation and adaptation being quite different from immigration and ecological assortment. Here, I use the chronological arrangement of the Hawaiian Islands to visualize snapshots of evolutionary history and stages of community assembly. Analysis of an adaptive radiation of habitat-associated, polychromatic spiders shows that (i) species assembly is not random; (ii) within any community, similar sets of… 
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