Communication in bottlenose dolphins: 50 years of signature whistle research

@article{Janik2013CommunicationIB,
  title={Communication in bottlenose dolphins: 50 years of signature whistle research},
  author={V. Janik and L. Sayigh},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={2013},
  volume={199},
  pages={479-489}
}
  • V. Janik, L. Sayigh
  • Published 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Comparative Physiology A
Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) produce individually distinctive signature whistles that broadcast the identity of the caller. Unlike voice cues that affect all calls of an animal, signature whistles are distinct whistle types carrying identity information in their frequency modulation pattern. Signature whistle development is influenced by vocal production learning. Animals use a whistle from their environment as a model, but modify it, and thus invent a novel signal. Dolphins also… Expand
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2013
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TLDR
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References

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  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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TLDR
It is demonstrated that bottlenose dolphins extract identity information from signature whistles even after all voice features have been removed from the signal, ensuring that dolphins are the only animals other than humans that have been shown to transmit identity information independent of the caller's voice or location. Expand
Bottlenose dolphins exchange signature whistles when meeting at sea
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  • Biology, Medicine
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TLDR
A novel method is presented, SIGnature IDentification (SIGID), that can identify signature whistles in recordings of groups of dolphins recorded via a single hydrophone and will facilitate the study of signature whistle use in the wild, signature whistle diversity between different populations, and potentially allow signatures whistles to be used in mark-recapture studies. Expand
The fallacy of ‘signature whistles’ in bottlenose dolphins: a comparative perspective of ‘signature information’ in animal vocalizations
In sharp contrast with descriptions of contact calls in all other species, the contact or cohesion calls used by bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, in contexts of social isolation have beenExpand
Facts about signature whistles of bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus
TLDR
Twenty whistles were randomly selected from each of 20 bottlenose dolphins from recordings made during brief capture–release events in Sarasota Bay, FL, U.S.A., and 10 judges were asked to visually group spectrograms based on similarity of their contours, and judges consistently grouped whistles according to the identity of the vocalizer. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
Whistle similarity between adult male dolphins that are partners in a close social alliance in order to test whether vocal learning may enable a similar vocal convergence suggests that as in songbirds and some other mammals, adult male bottlenose dolphins may use vocal learning to converge on similar whistles as they develop affiliative social relationships. Expand
Signature–whistle production in undisturbed free–ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)
Data from behavioural observations and acoustic recordings of free–ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were analysed to determine whether signature whistles are produced by wildExpand
Bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) calves appear to model their signature whistles on the signature whistles of community members
TLDR
The results suggest that calves may model their signature whistle on the signature whistles of members of their community, possibly community members with whom they associate only rarely. Expand
Context-specific use suggests that bottlenose dolphin signature whistles are cohesion calls
TLDR
Signature whistle copying was rare and did not initiate reunions or specific vocal responses, which strongly support the hypothesis that signature whistles are used to maintain group cohesion. Expand
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