Communication and information technology in medical education

@article{Ward2001CommunicationAI,
  title={Communication and information technology in medical education},
  author={Jeremy P. T. Ward and Jill Gordon and M. Field and Harold P. Lehmann},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2001},
  volume={357},
  pages={792-796}
}
The past few years have seen rapid advances in communication and information technology (C&IT), and the pervasion of the worldwide web into everyday life has important implications for education. Most medical schools provide extensive computer networks for their students, and these are increasingly becoming a central component of the learning and teaching environment. Such advances bring new opportunities and challenges to medical education, and are having an impact on the way that we teach and… Expand
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