Common questions and misconceptions about creatine supplementation: what does the scientific evidence really show?

@article{Antonio2021CommonQA,
  title={Common questions and misconceptions about creatine supplementation: what does the scientific evidence really show?},
  author={Jose Antonio and Darren G Candow and Scott C. Forbes and Bruno Gualano and Andrew R. Jagim and Richard B. Kreider and Eric S. Rawson and Abbie E. Smith‐Ryan and Trisha A. VanDusseldorp and Darryn Willoughby and Tim N. Ziegenfuss},
  journal={Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition},
  year={2021},
  volume={18}
}
Supplementing with creatine is very popular amongst athletes and exercising individuals for improving muscle mass, performance and recovery. Accumulating evidence also suggests that creatine supplementation produces a variety of beneficial effects in older and patient populations. Furthermore, evidence-based research shows that creatine supplementation is relatively well tolerated, especially at recommended dosages (i.e. 3-5 g/day or 0.1 g/kg of body mass/day). Although there are over 500 peer… 
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It is thought that creatine supplementation should not be used by an individual with preexisting renal disease and that risk should be evaluated before and during any supplementation period.
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TLDR
The preponderance of scientific evidence indicates that creatine supplementation appears to be a generally effective nutritional ergogenic aid for a variety of exercise tasks in a number of athletic and clinical populations.
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