Common Drug Side Effects and Drug‐Drug Interactions in Elderly Adults in Primary Care

@article{Merel2017CommonDS,
  title={Common Drug Side Effects and Drug‐Drug Interactions in Elderly Adults in Primary Care},
  author={Susan Eva Merel and Douglas S. Paauw},
  journal={Journal of the American Geriatrics Society},
  year={2017},
  volume={65}
}
  • S. Merel, D. Paauw
  • Published 2017
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Prescribing medications, recognizing and managing medication side effects and drug interactions, and avoiding polypharmacy are all essential skills in the care of older adults in primary care. Important side effects of medications commonly prescribed in older adults (statins, proton pump inhibitors, trimethoprim‐sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolone antibiotics, zolpidem, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors) were… Expand
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