Committing to socially responsible seafood

@article{Kittinger2017CommittingTS,
  title={Committing to socially responsible seafood},
  author={J. Kittinger and L. Teh and E. Allison and N. Bennett and L. Crowder and Elena M. Finkbeiner and Christina C. Hicks and Cheryl G. Scarton and Katrina Nakamura and Y. Ota and Jhana Young and A. Alifano and Ashley M. Apel and A. Arbib and Lori Bishop and M. Boyle and A. Cisneros-Montemayor and P. Hunter and Elodie Le Cornu and M. Levine and R. S. Jones and J. Koehn and M. Marschke and Julia G. Mason and F. Micheli and Loren McClenachan and Charlotte Opal and J. Peacey and S. H. Peckham and E. Schemmel and Vivienne Sol{\'i}s-Rivera and W. Swartz and T. '. Wilhelm},
  journal={Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={356},
  pages={912 - 913}
}
Ocean science must evolve to meet social challenges in the seafood sector Seafood is the world's most internationally traded food commodity. Approximately three out of every seven people globally rely on seafood as a primary source of animal protein (1). Revelations about slavery and labor rights abuses in fisheries have sparked outrage and shifted the conversation (2, 3), placing social issues at the forefront of a sector that has spent decades working to improve environmental sustainability… Expand
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