Commission, Omission, and Dissonance Reduction: Coping with Regret in the "Monty Hall" Problem

@article{Gilovich1995CommissionOA,
  title={Commission, Omission, and Dissonance Reduction: Coping with Regret in the "Monty Hall" Problem},
  author={Thomas Gilovich and Victoria Husted Medvec and Serena Chen},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={1995},
  volume={21},
  pages={182 - 190}
}
Do people reduce dissonance more for their errors of commission than their errors of omission? More specifically, do people come to value a disappointing outcome obtained through a direct action more than an identical outcome obtained through a failure to act? To answer this question, the authors created a laboratory analogue of the "three doors" or "Monty Hall" problem. Subjects initially selected one box from a group of three, only one of which contained a "grand" prize. After the… 
The influence of affect on suboptimal strategy choice in the Monty Hall dilemma
The Monty Hall dilemma (MHD) presents an intriguing choice anomaly that offers insight into human reasoning. It presents a specific subclass of decision tasks that require the adequate use of
The consequences of doing nothing: Inaction inertia as avoidance of anticipated counterfactual regret.
When an attractive action opportunity has been forgone, individuals tend to decline a substantially less attractive current opportunity in the same action domain, even though, in an absolute sense,
Revisions and Regret: The Cost of Changing your Mind
Decision reversals often imply improved decisions. Yet, people show a strong resistance against changing their minds. These are wellestablished findings, which suggest that changed decisions carry a
Cognitive Discrepancy, Dissonance, and Selective Exposure
AbstractAlthough cognitive dissonance is regarded as one of the most recognized causes of selective exposure [N. J. Stroud, Niche News (Oxford University Press, 2011)], the mechanism for such
Counterfactual Thought, Regret, and Superstition: How to Avoid Kicking Yourself
Some years ago, a charismatic 19-year-old Spanish matador nicknamed “Yiyo” was gored to death. Yiyo's death evoked considerable public anguish and debate (Schumacher, 1985). Making his fans' reaction
Cognitive Discrepancy, Dissonance, and Selective Exposure
Abstract Although cognitive dissonance is regarded as one of the most recognized causes of selective exposure [N. J. Stroud, Niche News (Oxford University Press, 2011)], the mechanism for such
The Monty Hall dilemma with pigeons: No, you choose for me
TLDR
In the Monty Hall dilemma, humans are initially given a choice among three alternatives, one of which has a hidden prize, and subjects are shown that one of the remaining alternatives does not have the prize and asked to stay with their original choice or switch to the remaining alternative.
The Monty Hall dilemma in pigeons: Effect of investment in initial choice
In the Monty Hall dilemma, humans are initially given a choice among three alternatives, one of which has a hidden prize. After choosing, but before it is revealed whether they have won the prize,
Undoing Regret on Dutch Television: Apologizing for Interpersonal Regrets Involving Actions or Inactions
In a series of studies, the authors examined apology as a means of undoing interpersonal regrets. In the first study, 63 cases from a Dutch television show called I. Am Sorry were coded on two
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 32 REFERENCES
Regret and Elation Following Action and Inaction
In their research on decision under uncertainty, Kahneman and Tversky (1982a) examined whether, given the same negative outcome, there is any difference in the experience of regret, depending on
Postdecision changes in the desirability of alternatives.
  • J. Brehm
  • Psychology
    Journal of abnormal psychology
  • 1956
TLDR
The present study was designed to test the following: Choosing between two alternatives creates dissonance and a consequent pressure to reduce it, which is reduced by making the chosen alternative more desirable and the unchosen alternative less desirable after the choice than they were before it.
The illusion of control.
A series of studies was conducted to elucidate a phenomenon here referred to as the "illusion of control." An illusion of control was denned as an expectancy of a personal success probability
The Role of Counterfactual Thinking in Judgments of Affect
The role of counterfactuals in judgments of affective reactions to outcomes was examined. Subjects read about individuals who experienced gains or losses as a result of either deciding to take action
Postdecision dissonance at post time.
TLDR
Results from both studies provide support for Feslinger's theory in a real life setting and indicate that dissonance-reducing processes may occur very rapidly following commitment to a decision.
Optimism About Elections: Dissonance Reduction at the Ballot Box
This field experiment investigated the effects of the act of voting itself on voters' attitudes in the 1984 presidential election. The subjects were 139 voters who were interviewed either on entering
The Psychology of Preferences
Presents examples in which a decision, preference, or emotional reaction is controlled by factors that may appear irrelevant to the choice made. The difficulty people have in maintaining a
...
...