Comments on the Systematics and Classification of the Beavers (Rodentia, Castoridae)

@article{Korth2004CommentsOT,
  title={Comments on the Systematics and Classification of the Beavers (Rodentia, Castoridae)},
  author={William W. Korth},
  journal={Journal of Mammalian Evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={8},
  pages={279-296}
}
  • W. Korth
  • Published 1 December 2001
  • Biology
  • Journal of Mammalian Evolution
The systematics of the beavers (Castoridae) are reviewed and definitions are presented for each subfamilial group. [...] Key Result Four subfamilies are recognized: primitive Agnotocastorinae (divided into two tribes, Agnotocastorini and Anchitheriomyini); burrowing beavers, Palaeocastorinae; giant beavers, Castoroidinae (containing two tribes, Castoroidini and Trogontheriini); and the Castorinae. The agnotocastorines are viewed as the ancestral group for all later subfamilies.Expand

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