Comments on Marik and Hooper: Normocaloric versus hypocaloric feeding on the outcomes of ICU patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Bitzani2016CommentsOM,
  title={Comments on Marik and Hooper: Normocaloric versus hypocaloric feeding on the outcomes of ICU patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Militsa Bitzani},
  journal={Intensive Care Medicine},
  year={2016},
  volume={42},
  pages={628-629}
}
  • M. Bitzani
  • Published 15 February 2016
  • Medicine
  • Intensive Care Medicine
Dear Editor, In a recent review and meta-analysis published online ahead of print on 10 November 2015 [1], Marik and Hooper addressed the impact of hypocaloric feeding on the outcome of critically ill patients. They reported no difference in the outcome parameters between patients receiving hypocaloric feeding and those fed normocalorically. Yet, both methodology and interpretation of the findings raise serious concern. Patients enrolled in the six studies included in the analysis were… 
Normocaloric versus hypocaloric feeding in ICU patients: response to comments by Bitzani
TLDR
It is important to emphasize that there is no high-quality evidence in critically ill or injured patients that one particular nutritional strategy is associated with better patient outcomes than another and it is inappropriate to make strong recommendations regarding the provision of calories and protein in this heterogenous group of patients.

References

SHOWING 1-4 OF 4 REFERENCES
Normocaloric versus hypocaloric feeding on the outcomes of ICU patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
This meta-analysis demonstrated no difference in the risk of acquired infections, hospital mortality, ICU length of stay or ventilator-free days between patients receiving intentional hypocaloric as compared to normocaloric nutritional goals.
Early high protein intake is associated with low mortality and energy overfeeding with high mortality in non-septic mechanically ventilated critically ill patients
TLDR
In non-septic critically ill patients, early high protein intake was associated with lower mortality and early energy overfeeding with higher mortality and in septic patients early highprotein intake had no beneficial effect on mortality.
Guidelines for the Provision and Assessment of Nutrition Support Therapy in the Adult Critically Ill Patient: Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.).
TLDR
The guidelines reiterate the importance of nutrition assessment-particularly, the detection of malnourished patients who are most vulnerable and therefore may benefit from timely intervention and there is a need for renewed focus on accurate estimation of energy needs and attention to optimizing protein intake.