Comments on “algorithms for reporting and counting geometric intersections”

@article{Brown1981CommentsO,
  title={Comments on “algorithms for reporting and counting geometric intersections”},
  author={Kevin Q. Brown},
  journal={IEEE Transactions on Computers},
  year={1981},
  volume={C-30},
  pages={147-148}
}
  • Kevin Q. Brown
  • Published 1 February 1981
  • Computer Science
  • IEEE Transactions on Computers
Comments on the paper by Bentley and Ottman (ibid., vol.28, p.643-7, 1979) which presents an algorithm for reporting all <i>K</i> intersections among <i>N</i> planar line segments in 0((<i>N</i>+<i>K</i>) log <i>N</i>) time and 0(<i>N</i>+<i>K</i>) storage. With a small modification that storage requirement can be reduced to 0(<i>N</i>) with no increase in computational time, which is important because <i>K</i> can grow as 0(<i>N</i><sup>2</sup>). 

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References

Geometric transforms for fast geometric algorithms
Many computational problems are inherently geometrical in nature. For example, cluster analysis involves construction of convex hulls of sets of points, LSI artwork analysis requires a test for